Your Options for Tickets From Different Counties or States

Speeding Ticket Lawyer

The realization that you’re being pulled over can be frustrating, but it is even worse if you are currently traveling. Contesting a ticket is a right given to all U.S. citizens, but do you know how being in a different county or state affects this right? It is important to know the rules of tickets received while traveling before you actually begin the trip.

Handling Tickets From Different Counties

When it comes to any aspect of traffic law, it is vital to understand that the laws vary from state to state and from county to county. When doing research, you need to look into the specific state and county where the ticket was received. Except in very limited circumstances, in order to contest a traffic ticket, you need to appear in the court for the specific county where the ticket is from. It is possible to request your case to be transferred to your home county, but these requests are almost always denied. Still, it may be worth asking.

Tickets in Other Counties and States

Studies have shown that tickets are more likely when traveling out of state. For the most part, this is due to unfamiliarity with the local traffic laws. Unfortunately, some police officers do target cars with out-of-state license plates intentionally, since their drivers are less likely to contest them. For these reasons, it is important for you to research the local traffic laws and do your best to drive safely and responsibly at all times when traveling.

Contesting a Ticket

If you choose to contest a ticket, this is what the process entails:

  1. Either contact the court prior to your set date, or appear in the correct court on the set date. You can plead “not guilty” or “no contest” and set a trial date. This is also when you would request a change in court location, reduction of the fine, community service instead of a fine, or payment plan. You can also request a trial by mail.
  2. Contact a traffic ticket attorney to get legal advice and representation.
  3. Appear in court on your trial date and attempt to have the violation removed from your record and fine eliminated.

Because it can be so inconvenient to appear in the court of a state or county far away from where you live, many people choose to simply pay the ticket, even if they would have contested normally. If you are not sure contesting is feasible, it is a good idea to talk to an attorney for advice.

Source: Speeding Ticket Lawyer Wytheville, VA, The Law Offices of Mark T. Hurt

Close Menu